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  • "There is no single profile of emotions common to all individuals with ADHD."

    An 11 year old who went “on strike” when asked to write Eleven-year-old Sandy was the best goalie on her travel soccer team. She was well-liked by her teammates and often praised by her coaches for her skills and consistent effort. Yet she hated school. She got along alright with her classmates and usually got passing grades, but was seen by her teachers as stubborn and temperamental. Now in 6th grade she had been having increasingly frequent incidents of what the teachers called “going on strike.” When the class was asked to write paragraphs or brief essays, Sandy often wrote nothing. When the teacher asked what was wrong, Sandy just stared ahead and did not respond. When the class was given a timed challenge test for math problems, Sandy often started with the others and then suddenly stopped, tore up her paper, refused to talk, and began repetitively kicking the desk in front of her until the teacher sent her out to the principal who told Sandy to complete the work at home and return with a better attitude. Sandy’s parents reported that it often took them 5 or 10 minutes to explain the writing assignment to Sandy and help her get started, but she then was able to complete the task, producing results that the teacher said were fully satisfactory. When I first met with Sandy and her parents, she was initially unwilling to answer any of my questions, but as I continued to talk with her parents, she gradually warmed up and began to respond, first with just facial expressions and nods or head-shaking, then gradually with words. Her mother told me that Sandy had been slow to speak as a young child, producing no words until she was 3 years old, but at that point she began suddenly to speak in sentences. I also learned that both Sandy and her mother had been diagnosed with ADHD several years earlier and that both were taking stimulant medication that they found helpful. Over a series of conversations together, I found that Sandy readily spoke with me about how her soccer team was doing, yet she was unwilling to discuss any incidents in school where the teacher had complained to her parents about her behavior. When her parents told me how teachers were complaining about her being angry, stubborn, and going on strike, Sandy kept her head down and stared at the floor as her eyes began to fill up with tears. Gradually it became clear that Sandy’s teachers were mistaken when they interpreted her “on strike” behavior as anger and stubbornness. That behavior was covering intense feelings of shame and fear. Sandy had very high standards for herself, especially for expository writing and for math. She also had ADHD-related problems with working memory and processing speed. Her working memory problems often caused her to get confused about oral directions given for writing assignments so she did not understand and remember what she was being asked to do. Her slow processing speed made it very difficult for her to keep up with her classmates in doing tightly timed math challenges. When she saw her classmates working much faster on the timed math quizzes, she felt embarrassed and gave up. When she felt confused about how to start her writing assignments, she froze in shame and was unable to respond to the teacher’s offers of help. What appeared as oppositional behavior was, in fact, a diversionary maneuver that served to distract her, her classmates and her teacher from what Sandy saw as humiliating failure. I asked Sandy’s pediatrician to add an SSRI to the stimulant medication Sandy had been taking for her ADHD; gradually that helped to reduce her chronic anxiety. I also tried to help Sandy and her parents to understand the puzzling intensity of her reactions to confusion and perceived failure. Her mother then reported that both her sister, Sandy’s aunt, and also Sandy’s maternal grandmother, had longstanding reputations in their family for quickly getting angry and then pulling into their shell when they felt anxious, especially when stress was in a social situation. We had a meeting with Sandy’s team of teachers who readily agreed to give written directions for writing assignments and to provide extra help for Sandy to learn how to get herself started on writing assignments. Her pediatrician, her parents and I also arranged to make some adjustments in Sandy’s ADHD medications so she could have more support for her problems with working memory and processing speed. Summary: There is no single profile of emotions common to all individuals with ADHD. There is much diversity due to differences in age, temperament, personality style, family life, cultural background, and many other variables. Yet there are some ADHD characteristics and some situations often experienced by many with ADHD (and those involved with them) that cause particular patterns of emotional dynamics to emerge more frequently among these people. These case studies describe some emotional dynamics often reported by children, adolescents or adults with ADHD and those who interact with them. The palette of human emotions is rich and variegated. It includes happiness, enthusiasm, interest, disinterest, boredom, delight, worry, fearfulness, panic, terror, frustration, annoyance, anger, rage, pride, envy, embarrassment, shame, guilt, jealousy, disappointment, discouragement, grief, hopelessness, sadness, depression, longing, trust, optimism, expectancy, determination, affection, passion, love, hope, and many others. Emotions are dynamic in that they often change and interact, sometimes in an instant, sometimes over hours, weeks or years. Often they change in response to specific circumstances of a situation, what someone else says or does and how individuals perceive and react to one another in given moments and over time. Sometimes emotions are quite transient, a flash of anger or a moment of jealousy, pride or affection that may quickly be modified or replaced by other emotions which may be quite contradictory. Emotions also may be persistent over much of a lifetime, absorbed into the fabric of one’s personality across differing settings. Emotions vary not only in type, but also in intensity. Sometimes emotions arise with fierce or crushing intensity; at other times that same emotion may be scarcely noticeable. Emotions also vary in level of consciousness. Sometimes a person is fully aware of a particular emotion in a given moment, yet at another time that person may be totally unaware of an emotion that others readily recognize and respond to. In all persons, emotions tend to arise in multiple mixes and blends. Sometimes the blend is subtle and convergent—affection and longing, pride and hope. In other instances, emotions strongly conflict with one another— interest and fear, pleasure and guilt, pride and resentment, love and hate. Sometimes the conflict is immediate; in other instances, one emotion may be followed quickly or gradually with another, or a person may experience rapid alternation between one emotion and another. Examples described in this case study may be experienced by various individuals in many different ways, only some of which are included here. Brown, T. E. (2017). Emotional Dynamics in Individuals, Couples, and Families Coping with ADHD. In Outside the Box; Rethinking ADD/ADHD in Children and Adults (pp. 151–170). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

  • Emotions Vary Not Only by Type, but Also in Intensity

    Case Study #2: An 8-year old exhibits rage outbursts followed by feelings of guilt. The parents of eight-year-old Michael explained “He’s very polite and well-behaved 90% of the time, but several times a day, like when we have to tell him to do a simple thing like to turn off a video game he’s playing so he can start getting ready for bed, he often, but not always, will fly into a rage, swear at us, and head-butt us, and then keep kicking against a door. This goes on for about 10 or 20 minutes and then he starts crying and says “I can’t move, I’m stuck, come help me.” He wants one of us to come hold him quietly for a minute or two, then he tells us he’s very sorry for being so bad and then it’s over and he’s all good again until the next time.” Michael’s mother shook her head and said “We’ve tried systems to reward him for any day without these meltdowns, but that didn’t help at all.” His father said, “When he does that stuff, it makes me so mad that I start screaming at him, even though I know that does no good at all and probably makes it worse.” Michael’s parents also reported, “He’s had a few episodes at school where he had meltdowns and hit other kids; he got suspended twice, but those are rare. Mostly, this just happens at home.” Two years prior to my seeing him, Michael had been diagnosed by another doctor as having ADHD; she prescribed some stimulant medication for him, but that had to be stopped because it intensified the meltdowns and anger outbursts. I arranged for Michael to begin a trial of a non-stimulant medication to help him control his intense episodes of anger; I also met individually with Michael, with his parents, and with the three of them together This was not just a problem with Michael; it was a problem for the whole family and was fueled by multiple factors. Michael clearly had a very short-fuse when he was frustrated; yet his impulsive angry outbursts were quickly followed by strong feelings of guilt and fear. His father reported that his own father, his father’s father and his brother all had struggled with brief, but intense outbursts of rage similar to what Michael experienced. This suggested that genetic factors were probably involved. Michael’s dad also reported that he himself felt overwhelmed with anger and screamed at Michael with intensity anytime Michael acted angry. This intensified Michael’s anger and his fear of his own temper and of his father. Michael’s father also acknowledged that he, himself had been diagnosed with ADHD and was taking medication for it. Unfortunately, his medication dosing was helping some, but not much. I suggested that he discuss the possibility of a change of medication or dosage change with his prescriber. The parents also explained that they were struggling with financial pressures. The husband had been laid off and had been unable to find a new job for more than a year. This was frustrating and embarrassing to him as his wife was working long hours to support the family while he was staying home taking care of the house and Michael. Meanwhile, Michael’s mother was clinically depressed and also frustrated that her husband often seemed not to be pulling his weight at home. Both parents were often in conflict, unable to provide much emotional support for one another or for Michael. Both clearly loved their son intensely and were committed to one another, but they were feeling increasingly frustrated with him, embarrassed that they could not control his outbursts or their own, and hopeless about how to help him and one another. There is no single profile of emotions common to all individuals with ADHD. There is much diversity due to differences in age, temperament, personality style, family life, cultural background, and many other variables. Yet there are some ADHD characteristics and some situations often experienced by many with ADHD (and those involved with them) that cause particular patterns of emotional dynamics to emerge more frequently among these people. These case studies describe some emotional dynamics often reported by children, adolescents or adults with ADHD and those who interact with them. The palette of human emotions is rich and variegated. It includes happiness, enthusiasm, interest, disinterest, boredom, delight, worry, fearfulness, panic, terror, frustration, annoyance, anger, rage, pride, envy, embarrassment, shame, guilt, jealousy, disappointment, discouragement, grief, hopelessness, sadness, depression, longing, trust, optimism, expectancy, determination, affection, passion, love, hope, and many others. Emotions are dynamic in that they often change and interact, sometimes in an instant, sometimes over hours, weeks or years. Often they change in response to specific circumstances of a situation, what someone else says or does and how individuals perceive and react to one another in given moments and over time. Sometimes emotions are quite transient, a flash of anger or a moment of jealousy, pride or affection that may quickly be modified or replaced by other emotions which may be quite contradictory. Emotions also may be persistent over much of a lifetime, absorbed into the fabric of one’s personality across differing settings. Emotions vary not only in type, but also in intensity. Sometimes emotions arise with fierce or crushing intensity; at other times that same emotion may be scarcely noticeable. Emotions also vary in level of consciousness. Sometimes a person is fully aware of a particular emotion in a given moment, yet at another time that person may be totally unaware of an emotion that others readily recognize and respond to. In all persons, emotions tend to arise in multiple mixes and blends. Sometimes the blend is subtle and convergent—affection and longing, pride and hope. In other instances, emotions strongly conflict with one another— interest and fear, pleasure and guilt, pride and resentment, love and hate. Sometimes the conflict is immediate; in other instances, one emotion may be followed quickly or gradually with another, or a person may experience rapid alternation between one emotion and another. Examples described in this case study may be experienced by various individuals in many different ways, only some of which are included here. Brown, T. E. (2017). Emotional Dynamics in Individuals, Couples, and Families Coping with ADHD. In Outside the Box; Rethinking ADD/ADHD in Children and Adults (pp. 151–170). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

  • Emotional Dynamics in individuals, couples & families with ADHD

    Case Study #1: A 7-year old who feels picked on by adults. Seven-year-old Jimmy’s mother met him at the front door as he came home from school. She gave him a hug and asked “How was school today?” Jimmy dropped his school bag and jacket on the floor in front of the door and, without answering, headed toward the kitchen to find a snack. His mother called him back to pick up his jacket and school bag. Jimmy came back with a grumpy face and announced, “School was terrible; it’s always terrible. She’s always yelling at me just like you are now! His mother responded, “I wasn’t yelling at you, I just asked you to come back to pick up your jacket and school bag and put them where they belong, not just leaving them in front of the door.” Jimmy picked up his stuff grumbling, “It’s always that way, you and my teacher and my soccer coach, all of you are always yelling at me and saying that I did something wrong or didn’t do something I was supposed to do. Nobody else ever gets yelled at so much all the time.” Young children with ADHD, especially if it is not effectively treated, often complain that their parents, teachers, and other adults are constantly yelling at them. This “yelling” may sometimes involve angry comments with a raised voice; though often it is simply a matter of very frequent reminders and corrections that may be necessary, but they may leave the child feeling singled out, far more often than other children, as the one who is not doing what is expected. Many teachers and parents of children with ADHD report that they need to give reminders or corrections to those with ADHD as much a five to ten times more often than to most of their classmates or siblings. Even when these frequent corrections are done with minimal intensity and without any overt annoyance, the impact on the child’s view of self may be substantially impacted. When this pattern goes on with much daily frequency for many years, as it does for some children with ADHD, the result is often a combination of feeling picked on, unappreciated, and incompetent, relative to others of similar age. One antidote to this problem is for parents and teachers to find or create frequent opportunities to recognize when their child is doing something well so they can give recognition or praise for doing the right thing. In the routines of daily life, it is easy to mention mostly the actions one finds frustrating or wants to see changed, while not mentioning much at all those actions one would like to see more frequently. When a child complains about others being too critical or getting too irritable with them, it may be helpful to listen to the child’s complaint and perhaps offer some empathy or validation, “Yeah, it’s not much fun to feel like you’re always the one getting told you’re in the wrong. Sometimes it may be that you really are doing something you should change, but other times it may be that the grown up is just having a bad day.” Sometimes such complaints are an indirect way of asking for some recognition and encouragement to counter frustrations of the day. There is no single profile of emotions common to all individuals with ADHD. There is much diversity due to differences in age, temperament, personality style, family life, cultural background, and many other variables. Yet there are some ADHD characteristics and some situations often experienced by many with ADHD (and those involved with them) that cause particular patterns of emotional dynamics to emerge more frequently among these people. This chapter describes some emotional dynamics often reported by children, adolescents or adults with ADHD and those who interact with them. The palette of human emotions is rich and variegated. It includes happiness, enthusiasm, interest, disinterest, boredom, delight, worry, fearfulness, panic, terror, frustration, annoyance, anger, rage, pride, envy, embarrassment, shame, guilt, jealousy, disappointment, discouragement, grief, hopelessness, sadness, depression, longing, trust, optimism, expectancy, determination, affection, passion, love, hope, and many others. Emotions are dynamic in that they often change and interact, sometimes in an instant, sometimes over hours, weeks or years. Often they change in response to specific circumstances of a situation, what someone else says or does and how individuals perceive and react to one another in given moments and over time. Sometimes emotions are quite transient, a flash of anger or a moment of jealousy, pride or affection that may quickly be modified or replaced by other emotions which may be quite contradictory. Emotions also may be persistent over much of a lifetime, absorbed into the fabric of one’s personality across differing settings. Emotions vary not only in type, but also in intensity. Sometimes emotions arise with fierce or crushing intensity; at other times that same emotion may be scarcely noticeable. Emotions also vary in level of consciousness. Sometimes a person is fully aware of a particular emotion in a given moment, yet at another time that person may be totally unaware of an emotion that others readily recognize and respond to. In all persons, emotions tend to arise in multiple mixes and blends. Sometimes the blend is subtle and convergent—affection and longing, pride and hope. In other instances, emotions strongly conflict with one another— interest and fear, pleasure and guilt, pride and resentment, love and hate. Sometimes the conflict is immediate; in other instances, one emotion may be followed quickly or gradually with another, or a person may experience rapid alternation between one emotion and another. Examples described may be experienced by various individuals in many different ways, only one of which is included in the case study above. Brown, T. E. (2017). Emotional Dynamics in Individuals, Couples, and Families Coping with ADHD. In Outside the Box; Rethinking ADD/ADHD in Children and Adults (pp. 151–170). Arlington, VA: American Psychiatric Association Publishing.

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  • Book Critiques | Brown ADHD Clinic | United States

    Top of Page Outside the Box Smart bu Stuck A New Understanding of ADHD ADD: The Unfocused Mind ADHD Comorbidities Handbook Book Critiques Outside the Box: Rethinking ADD in Children and Adults— A Practical Guide Outside the Box is arguably the best practical book ever written on ADHD. Laden with compelling case examples that humanize this condition, the writing is both authoritative and readable. Overall, the book masterfully blends the underlying science related to ADHD with extremely helpful guidance for assessment and treatment. It is a “must-read” for anyone dealing with ADHD. Stephen P. Hinshaw, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley ​ This book is another example of Dr. Brown’s exceptional ability to convey complex information about ADHD to a broad audience in easily understandable terms yet based on the scientific evidence. It provides not only a fine understanding of ADHD, its complexity and its causes, but also a number of insightful cases and evidence-based recommendations for its management. Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry, Medical University of South Carolina ​ This brilliant book by a superb clinician-researcher compresses a wealth of vital, practical information into a marvelously user-friendly and engaging format. It’s chock-full of everything anyone interested in ADHD wants to know, arranged in such a way that you can find what you want and will never be bored. Edward Hallowell, M.D., author of Driven to Distraction and other books ​ This down-to-earth book shows what ADHD really is and what it isn’t. Brown gives us a true “feel” for ADHD and the impact of symptoms on people’s lives. He defines executive functions in clear examples just as his patients described to him. For those want an in-depth understanding of ADHD as it occurs in children, youth and adults, this book is a must read. Michael J. Manos, PhD, Head of Pediatric Behavioral Health. Cleveland Clinic ​ Professor Brown translates complex science into everyday language. This is THE guide for everyone having questions or doubts about ADHD. Case descriptions are delivered in an empathic tone that only one who has dedicated a lifetime to caring for patients and families with ADHD could provide. Highly recommended for patients, their families and professionals interested in ADHD. Luis Augusto Rohde., M.D. Professor of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil & President of the World Federation of ADHD ​ This book is essential reading for anyone who wants to better understand ADHD across the life span. Brown gathers together some of the best thinking and research from a variety of fields to answer some of the most crucial questions about this still vexing and all-too-common condition. He has delivered a clear, comprehensive work that is both engaging and original. A rewarding, useful and accessible read. F. Xavier Castellanos, M.D., Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Professor of Professor of Radiology, and Physiology and Neuroscience, and Director, Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders. New York University, Langone Medical Center Child Study Center ​ Outside the Box offers an accessible update on the latest research about ADHD and answers questions and doubts that many struggle with about this disorder which is very prevalent in children and adults all over the world. Sandra Kooij, M.D., Ph.D., Chair, European Network Adult ADHD ​ Tom Brown’s clearly written, evidence-based update on Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder is a must-read for professionals working with people struggling with ADHD and for adolescents and adults with ADHD seeking a deeper understanding of the disorder. The many clinical vignettes add interest and remind us of the person behind the diagnosis. Sections debunking common misunderstandings and summarizing important facts about ADHD are gems! Mina K. Dulcan, M.D. Head, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago, Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine ​ Comprehensive, compassionate, and clear, Brown’s authoritative survey on attention deficit disorders integrates rich clinical experience with cutting-edge neuroscience and epidemiology. The book provides a textured overview of ADD/ADHD symptoms and comorbidities. Brown’s views on such topics as measurement bias and non-pharmaceutical adjunctive treatment are compelling. This rigorous yet approachable text is ideal for clinicians, academic researchers, parents and patients alike. Ronald C. Kessler, Ph.D., McNeil Family Professor, Department of Health Care Policy, Harvard Medical School ​ Well written, clear and concise, Dr. Brown’s Outside the Box explodes many of the myths and misunderstandings surrounding ADHD. In his calm, reassuring style, he provides the information families and young adults with ADHD need to not only to understand this disorder, but also to seek out proper treatment This is a much needed book amidst all the confusion that abounds today. Patricia O. Quinn, MD, Developmental Pediatrician, Washington DC and author of 100 Questions and Answers about ADHD in Women and Girls ​ Professor Brown has written with his usual insightful understanding and communicates in an understandable way that will be a most valuable asset for professionals, patients, and parents alike. A brilliant read and one I will come back to many times. As a patient advocate, this is an invaluable resource for me. Andrea Bilbow, OBE, Founder of Attention Deficit Information and Support Service (ADDISS) in U.K. Smart but Stuck: Emotions in Teens and Adults “No matter where you are in your journey to success, if you have ADHD, this book will help to speed you on your way. I could not recommend it more highly.” Edward (Ned) Hallowell, MD, author, Driven to Distraction and Delivered from Distraction ​ ​ “Clearly written, rich in detail, and full of helpful advice, this book will be beneficial to anyone with ADHD and to those who struggle to live with, understand, and help them.” Russell A. Barkley, PhD, clinical professor, Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina; author, Taking Charge of ADHD and Taking Charge of Adult ADHD ​ ​ “This book, reflecting Dr. Brown’s 35 years of clinical practice combined with the latest findings from affective neuroscience, is a must-read for anyone who is interested in ADHD.”​ James J. Gross, PhD, professor, psychology, Stanford University; editor, Handbook of Emotion Regulation ​ ​ “Dr. Brown introduces a forgotten piece in the life of those suffering from ADHD—the role of emotions.” Luis Augusto Rohde, MD, PhD, president, World Federation of ADHD; professor,psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil. ​ ​ “These engaging vignettes vividly bring to life emotional difficulties that, even for very intelligent teens and adults, can lead to frustration and failure in efforts to overcome their deficits in attention, organization, and motivation.” Mina K. Dulcan, MD, professor, Psychiatry, Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics,Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago and Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults “Dr. Brown more than fulfills his promise to provide an accessible summary that describes and integrates new facts and perspectives on ADHD. The book is comprehensive, current, and engagingly written. It will be a terrific resource for parents, educators, and clinicians as well as for patients themselves.”​​​​​​ F. Xavier Castellanos, M.D., Brooke and Daniel Neidich Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Professor of Radiology and Physiology and Neuroscience, and Director, Center for Neurodevelopmental Disorders, New York University Langone Medical Center Child Study Center ​ “Brown presents a comprehensive case for comprehending this disorder in terms of a wide range of executive functions, rather than on the basis of behavior and attention alone. Loaded with up-to-date research findings and synthetic in scope, this work is bound to challenge assumptions and pave the way toward new paradigms.”​ Stephen P. Hinshaw, Ph.D., Professor of Psychology, University of California, Berkeley, and Editor, Psychological Bulletin ​ “Tom Brown’s book is placing cognitive changes at the heart of ADHD and drawing out the implications for clinicians and researchers. It is a welcome corrective to the overemphasis on disruptive behavior and it is written so clearly that it can be recommended to everyone who wants to understand the nature of this serious problem for adults and children.” Eric Taylor, FRCP, FRCPsych, Professor of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Institute of Psychiatry, University of London ​ ​ “A very intriguing read. Dr. Brown skillfully examines the diverse nature of executive functions, ADHD, and their overlap.” Timothy E. Wilens, M.D., Associate Professor of Psychiatry, Harvard Medical School, and Director of Substance Abuse Services, Massachusetts General Hospital ​ “Professionals and lay people looking for a synthesis of our current understanding of this condition will find Dr. Brown’s latest book a sensible, understandable, and very readable contribution.” Gabrielle A. Carlson, M.D., Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, and Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Stony Brook University School of Medicine. ​ ​ “Dr. Brown presents a science-driven and cohesive way of re-conceptualizing the disorder, revitalizing the central role of executive functioning impairment in ADHD. This book translates recent advance in ADHD science into understandable words not only for mental health professionals, but for all those interest in this very prevalent disorder affecting individuals across the whole life cycle.” Luis Augusto Rohde, M.D., Ph.D., President of the World Federation of ADHD, and Professor of Psychiatry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil ​ ​ “Tom Brown’s newest book pulls from the latest research in ADHD to present anew explanatory paradigm. Research results are distilled to debunk myths and offer sound guidance on evaluation and effective treatment. This book is a must-read for any education, health, or mental health professional who encounters children or adults with ADHD. Its direct and clear language makes the explanations and conclusions accessible to parents and adult patients, too.” Mina K. Dulcan, M.D., Osterman Professor of Child Psychiatry and Head, Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at the Ann & Robert H. Lurie Children’s Hospital of Chicago; Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics, and Director, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. ​ “This book presents a highly useful and current summation of the major findings concerning ADHD and the role of executive functioning in it. Clinicians, students, and laypeople will find here much valuable information on the disorder, its assessment and diagnosis, and its management.” Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D., Clinical Professor of Psychiatry and Pediatrics, Medical University of South Carolina. ​ “Thomas E. Brown has produced a comprehensive reference. It extends our understanding of the impact of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder as that diagnosis assumes new borders in DSM 5.” Martha Bridge Denckla, M.D., Professor of Neurology, Pediatrics, and Psychiatry, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Director, Developmental Cognitive Neurology, Kennedy Krieger Institute. ​ “Tom Brown is one of the true pioneers in our growing understanding of ADHD. Both a clinician and a researcher, he continues to deepen and enlarge our knowledge of ADHD. Dr. Brown is a dedicated doctor who’s written yet another brilliant book.” Edward Hallowell, M.D., author of Delivered from Distraction and The Childhood Roots of Adult Happiness ​ Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults “This fine book, is rich with clinical anecdotes that provide great insight into ADD/ADHD. It demonstrates why ADHD is a far more profound disorder of cognitive development than many people believe. Dispelling many myths, this book provides scientifically based recommendations for the management of the disorder. Well done and well worth reading.” Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D. SUNY Upstate Medical School ​ “Authoritative and ground-breaking. This is a superb book. I recommend it highly!” Edward Hallowell, M.D., author of Delivered from Distraction: Getting the Most Out of Life with ADD ​ “A timely, practical and much needed text on a medical problem of enormous importance. A lucid discussion, exquisitely attuned to both the critical assessment of empirical fact and the unique human situation of each patient.” Joaquin M. Fuster, M.D., Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, author of The Prefrontal Cortex ​ “Dr. Brown provides compassionate understanding and a fresh perspective on how manifestations of ADHD change across childhood, adolescence and adulthood.” Rosemary Tannock, Ph.D., The Hospital for Sick Children & University of Toronto, Canada ​ “While rooted in science, this book goes far beyond typical clinical explanations to get to the heart of the matter. People living with ADHD will identify themselves and their loved ones on every page.” Evelyn Polk Green, Attention Deficit Disorder Association ​ “Dr. Brown has combined neuroscience information with very good clinical examples in a way that will be of great benefit for patients, for students and clinicians.” Professor Joseph Sergeant, Ph.D. Free University of Amsterdam ​ “People struggling with problems organizing themselves and concentrating will find much here to help them know and overcome their difficulties.” Professor Eric Taylor, FRCP, FRCPsych. Institute of Psychiatry, King’s College, University of London ​ “Readers will come away with new insights and a treasure trove of essential strategies to effectively manage ADHD and related conditions.” Harvey C. Parker, Ph.D., Co-founder of Children and Adults with Attention Deficit Disorder (CHADD) ​ “This book provides a vivid and lucid description of ADHD across the lifespan; as a clinical resource, it will be useful to professionals and lay readers.” Martha Bridge Denckla, M.D. The Kennedy Krieger Institute, Johns Hopkins University ​ “Attention Deficit Disorders documents Dr. Brown’s thirty years of listening to patients of all ages who tried, but could not ‘pay attention.’ Patients will recognize the deficits that have hampered them, and meet others with similar difficulties.” Margaret Weiss, M.D., Ph.D. Children and Women’s Health Centre in British Columbia. Author of ADHD in Adulthood. ​ “Dr. Brown’s book clearly describes Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and its treatment. Through many examples, it clarifies what is known and what are myths and misinformation.” Mark Wolraich, M.D., University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center ADHD Comorbidities: Handbook for ADHD Complications in Children and Adults “This book offers a rich compendium of information about what is currently known about ADHD and how it can be most effectively treated in all its complexities.” From the Forword. F. Xavier Castellanos, M.D. , New York University Child Study Center and Nathan Kline Institute for Psychiatric Research, New York, New York. ​ This is the most up-to-date book on this topic currently available and richly rewards the reader, whether clinician, scientist, or student, with its substantial breadth of coverage and detail. Russell A. Barkley, Ph.D., Clinical Professor, Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, and Research Professor, SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, New York. ​ Every conceivable psychiatric comorbidity is covered, by experts in each. Specific chapters are devoted to assessment of ADHD and comorbid disorders and the variety of treatments: pharmacotherapy, psychosocial interventions, cognitive therapy for adults, and tailoring treatment to best fit each person and family. Given the high prevalence of ADHD, this volume should be on every clinician’s shelf. Mina Dulcan, M.D., Osterman Professor of Child Psychiatry, Children’s Memorial Hospital; Head, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Children’s Memorial Hospital and Northwestern Memorial Hospital; Head, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Professor of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and Pediatrics, Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois ​ “It is a comprehensive and exhaustive volume, with ample references, suggestions for further readings, and even useful web sites. While the information can be overwhelming, the variety of therapeutic responses to the syndrome—from cognitive and behavioral therapy to appropriate medication—offer a glimmer of hope for concerned teachers and beleaguered family members.” From “Review of ADHD Comorbidities: Handbook for ADHD Complications in Children and Adults.” Merri Rosenberg, Education Update (www.EducationUpdate.com ). To read the rest of the review, download the pdf.

  • Dr. Brown's Reading List | Brown ADHD Clinic | United States

    Top of Page Overview of ADHD For Parents/Teachers of ADHD Children For Parents & Teachers of Teens For Teens with ADHD For College Students with ADHD For Adults with ADHD Books for Children Education, Learning Disabilities and Teaching Strategies Asperger’s Syndrome Bipolar Disorder Bipolar Disorder Substance Abuse Disorders Dr. Brown's ADHD Reading List Overview of ADHD ​ Brown, T. E. (2013). A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults: Executive Function Impairments. New York: Routledge. ​ Introduction of a new working definition of ADHD as developmentally-impaired executive function with updated information about scientific research that supports the new EF model. 35 myths about ADHD are challenged with scientific facts and implications of the new model for assessment and treatment of ADHD are described in terms understandable for both general public and professionals. Brown, T. E. (2005). Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults. New Haven: Yale University Press. ​ A new model of Attention Deficit Disorder as impairment of the brain’s management system. Written for general public and professionals, includes many case examples that show how ADD changes across the lifespan. Brown, T. E., Ed. (2009). ADHD Comorbidities: Handbook for ADHD Complications in Children and Adults. Washington, D.C.: American Psychiatric Publishing. ​ A comprehensive, though somewhat technical text book about ADHD and other commonly co-existing disabilities, such as ADHD and mood disorders, ADHD and anxiety disorders, ADHD and Sleep Problems, ADHD and OCD, ADHD and Tourette’s, ADHD and Substance Abuse, etc. ​ ​ ​ ​ For Parents/Teachers of Children with ADHD ​ Barkley, R. A. (2013). Taking Charge of ADHD: Complete, Authoritative Guide for Parents. New York: Guilford Press. Complete authoritative guide for parents. Covers topics such as understanding ADHD, evaluations, behavior management, educational issues and medications. Not much coverage of ADD without hyperactivity ​ Quinn, P. O., Nadeau, K. G., & Littman, E. B. (2000). Understanding Girls with AD/HD. Silver Spring, MD: Advantage Books. A helpful book to understand the special issues regarding girls with ADHD ​ Wilens, T. E. (2008). Straight Talk About Psychiatric Medications for Kids-Third Edition. New York: Guilford Press. ​ Answers to parents questions about medications from a leading authority in Psychiatry ​ Phelan, T. W. (2010). 1-2-3 Magic Glen Ellyn: Child Management Inc. Effective discipline for children ages 2-12. Easy to read strategies and clearly defined plan to successfully manage their children’s’ behavior ​ Phelan, T. W. (2012). Surviving Your Adolescents: How to Manage and Let Go of Your 13-18 Year Olds. Glen Ellyn: Child Management Inc. ​ Practical suggestions about how to improve communication with teenage; managing risk-taking and learning to let go ​ Greene, R. W. (2010). The Explosive Child-Revised & Updated. New York: HarperCollins. ​ An excellent, helpful book for parents of children who are easily frustrated and chronically inflexible offers insight into understanding and parenting these challenging children ​ Klass, P. & Costello, E. (2003). Quirky Kids: Understanding and Helping Your Child Who Doesn’t Fit In—When to Worry and When Not to Worry. New York: Ballantine. ​ ​ Sensible, practical advice for parents of children who have difficulties in fitting in due to autistic spectrum disorders, sensory integration dysfunction and more ​ Brooks, R., Goldstein, S. (2001). Raising Resilient Children. Chicago: Contemporary Books. ​ Warm and supportive guide for parents to improve communication to develop children’s sense of confidence and self-worth ​ Packer, L. E. & S. K. Pruitt. (2010). Challenging Kids, Challenged Teachers: Teaching Students with Tourette’s, Bipolar Disorder, Executive Dysfunction, OCD, ADHD and More. ​ Practical suggestions about strategies for dealing with students with multiple difficulties. ​ Rief, S. F. (2005). How to Reach and Teach Children with ADD/ADHD, 2nd Edition. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass. ​ Practical techniques, strategies, and interventions for teachers of children with ADHD ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ For Parents & Teachers of Teens ​ Dendy, C. A. Z. (1995). Teenagers With ADD: A Parents’ Guide. Bethesda,MD: Woodbine House, Inc. ​ A hands-on guide for parents and professionals about the issues and challenges of daily life faced by teens with ADHD. Written by a mom who has “been there” ​ Dendy, C. A. Z. (2000). Teaching Teens with ADD and ADHD. Bethesda,MD: Woodbine House. ​ A reference guide for parents and teachers loaded with strategies, interventions, and tips to create a positive learning experience ​ Kuhn, C., Swartzwelder, S., & Wilson, W. (2003). Buzzed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. ​ The straight facts about the most used & abused drugs from alcohol to ecstasy. An informative book for adults and adolescents about substance abuse ​ Snyder, J. M. (2001). AD/HD & Driving. Whitefish: Whitefish Consultants. ​ A guide for parents and teens with ADHD that addresses specific problems and issues of teenage drivers ​ ​ ​ ​ For Teens with ADHD ​ Dendy, C. A. Z., & Zeigler, A. (2003). A Bird’s-Eye View of Life with ADD and ADHD: Advice from Young Survivors. Cedar Bluff: Cherish the Children. ​ A book for teens, written by teens living with the challenges of ADHD that offers advice and strategies ​ Nadeau, K. G. (1998). Help4ADD@High School. Bethesda: Advantage Books. ​ An excellent user friendly guide for teens with ADD ​ Kuhn, C., Swartzwelder, S., & Wilson, W. (2008). Buzzed-3rd Edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. ​ Straight facts about the most used & abused drugs from alcohol to ecstasy. An informative book for adults and adolescents about substance abuse ​ ​ ​ ​ For College Students with ADHD ​ Mooney, J. and D. Cole (2000). Learning Outside the Lines. New York: Simon & Schuster. ​ Two Ivy League students with ADHD and learning disorders offer witty and practical advice on strategies to survive and thrive in the learning environment of colleges and universities. ​ Bramer, J. S. (1996) Succeeding in College with Attention Deficit Disorders. ​ Vignettes that illustrate frustrations and effective strategies for college students with ADHD. ​ Kuhn, C., Swartzwelder, S., & Wilson, W. (2003). Buzzed. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. ​ Straight facts about the most used & abused drugs from alcohol to ecstasy. An informative book for adults and adolescents about substance abuse ​ Quinn, P. O., N.A. Ratey, & T.L. Maitlin. (2000). Coaching College Students with AD/HD. Silver Spring, MD: Advantage Books. ​ A useful resource about difficulties with time and task management experienced by many college students with ADHD. Offers suggestions for those who want to assist these students. ​ ​ ​ ​ For Adults with ADHD ​ Hallowell, E. M., & Ratey, J. J. (1994). Driven to Distraction. New York: Random House. ​ A very popular overview of ADHD by psychiatrists who understand it from their own experience. ​ Hallowell, E. M., & Ratey, J. J. (2005). Delivered From Distraction. New York: Random House. ​ Very readable description of how those with ADHD can understand themselves in more adaptive and hopeful ways. ​ Hallowell, E. M. & Hallowell, S. G. (2010). Married to Distraction. New York: Ballantine. ​ A compassionate and sensible approach to help couples with or without a partner having ADHD to deal constructively with distractions and disruptions to intimacy in their relationships. ​ Solden, S. (2012). Women With Attention Deficit Disorder: Embrace Your Differences and Transform Your Life. Grass Valley, CA: Underwood Books. ​ A well written guide that describes the unique perspective of women with ADD ​ Nadeau, K. G., & Quinn, P. O. (Eds.). (2002). Understanding Women with AD/HD. Silver Spring: Advantage Books. ​ Addresses issues faced by women with ADHD at all stages of life ​ Barkley, R. A. and Benton, C. M. (2010). Taking Charge of Adult ADHD. New York: Guilford. ​ A comprehensive overview of practical information about ADHD in adulthood and strategies for improving difficulties in education, work, finances, social relationships, etc. ​ Nadeau, K. G. (1997). ADD in the Workplace: Choices, Changes and Challenges. New York: Brunner/Mazel. ​ A user friendly guide for ADD adults covering both general and more specific issues regarding work and careers ​ Nadeau, K. G. (1996). Adventures in Fast Forward: Life, Love and Work for the ADD Adult. New York: Brunner/Mazel. ​ A great book for ADD adults with workable coping strategies for living ​ Pera, G. (2008). Is it You, Me, or Adult A.D.D.: Stopping the Roller Coaster When Someone You Love Has Attention Deficit Disorder. San Francisco: 1201 Alarm Press. ​ A perceptive description of multiple ways in which ADHD problems can cause both partners in a relationship to become demoralized or caught up in chronic conflict. Includes multiple examples of useful strategies to deal with such problems ​ Kohlberg, Judith and Nadeau, K. G (2002). ADD-Friendly Ways to Organize Your Life. New York: Brunner-Routledge. ​ Practical advice on how to organize time, money and stuff ​ Tuckman, A. (2009) More Attention, Less Deficit: Success Stories for Adults with ADHD. Plantation, FL. Specialty Press. ​ Sensible descriptions of practical problems of adults with ADHD and strategies to overcome them ​ ​ ​ ​ Books for Children ​ Corman, C. L., & Trevino, E. (1995). Eukee the Jumpy Jumpy Elephant. Plantation: Specialty Press, Inc. ​ An upbeat positive message of success for young children with ADD, ages 3-8 ​ Galvin, M. (1988). Otto Learns About His Medicine. New York: Magination Press. ​ A children’s story about a fidgety car who needs medication to control his hyperactivity, ages 3-8 ​ Levine, M. (1990). Keeping A Head in School. Cambridge: Educators Publishing Service, Inc. ​ A large print collection of stories for young readers about learning abilities and learning disorders, ages 5-8 ​ Levine, M. (1993). All Kinds of Minds. Cambridge: Educators Publishing Service, Inc. ​ A guide for students in upper elementary and middle school about learning abilities and learning disorders, ages 9-13 ​ Gehret, J. (1990). The Don’t-give-up Kid and Learning Differences. Fairport: Verbal Images Press. ​ A positive, uplifting story about learning differences, ages 5-10 ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Books about, Education, Learning Disabilities and Teaching Strategies ​ Anderson, W., Chitwood, S., & Hayden, D. (1997). Negotiating the Special Education Maze. (Third Ed.). Bethesda, MD: Woodbine House. ​ A guide to understanding the special education system and making it work for individual families. A must for families seeking special education services for their child ​ Osman, B. B. (1997). Learning Disabilities and ADHD. New York: John Wiley and Sons, Inc. ​ Practical strategies and useful advice on learning disabilities. Clearly organized by topic so readers can find areas of particular concern or interest ​ Shaywitz, S. (2003). Overcoming Dyslexia. New York: Alfred A. Knopf. ​ A book about children and adults with reading problems ​ Silver, L. B. (1992). The Misunderstood Child. (2nd ed.). Bradenton: HSI and TAB Books. ​ A guide for parents that discusses learning disabilities, ADHD, psychological, emotional and social development as well as diagnosis and treatment ​ Berninger, V. W. and T. L. Richards (2002). Brain Literacy for Educators and Psychologists. New York: Academic Press. ​ Very useful textbook linking problems in brain function with practical problems in learning and teaching of reading, writing and math. ​ ​ ​ ​ Asperger’s Syndrome ​ Attwood, T. (2007). The Complete Guide to Asperger’s Syndrome. London: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. ​ Very readable book that describes Asperger’s disorder for parents and professionals ​ Jackson, L. (2002). Freaks, Geeks & Asperger Syndrome. Philadelphia: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. ​ Written by a teen with Asperger Syndrome, practical first hand experiences offer guidance for adolescents with Asperger’s ​ Lovecky, D. (2004). Different Minds: Gifted Children with AD/HD, Asperger’s Syndrome, and other Learning Deficits. New York: Jessica Kingsley Publishers. ​ Descriptions of the special strengths and difficulties experienced by many children who are extremely bright and talented, but also impaired by ADHD, Asperger’s and related problems ​ Myles, B. S., & Southwick, J. (1999). Asperger Syndrome and Difficult Moments. Shawnee Mission: Autism Asperger Publishing Co. ​ Practical solutions for tantrums, meltdowns, and rage. Geared more toward classroom management ​ Tanguay, P. B. (2001). Nonverbal Learning Disabilities at Home. Philadelphia: Jessica Kinglsey Publishers. ​ A valuable, easy to use reference that parents can turn to again and again, filled with strategies and suggestions to help NVLD kids at home ​ ​ ​ ​ Bipolar Disorder ​ Jamison, K. R. (1995). An Unquiet Mind. New York: Vintage Books. ​ A personal memoir of a successful medical school professor who suffers from bipolar disorder. Moving and enlightening ​ Waltz, M. (2000). Bipolar Disorders. Sebastopol: O’Reilly & Associates, Inc. ​ A comprehensive look at bipolar disorders in children and adolescents, description of the disorders, diagnosis, medications, life and school issues ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder ​ Neqiroglu, F., & Yaryura-Tobia, J. (1995). Over and Over Again. New York: Lexington Books. ​ An informative book about obsessive compulsive disorder that combines the latest scientific knowledge and practical suggestions for self-help ​ Rapoport, J. L. (1989). The Boy Who Couldn’t Stop Washing. New York: E. P. Dutton. ​ A collection of personal stories from people who have obsessive compulsive disorder about their experiences and successes with the disorder ​ ​ ​ ​ ​ Substance Abuse Disorders ​ Kuhn, C., Swartzwelder, S., & Wilson, W. (2008). Buzzed-3rd Edition. New York: W. W. Norton & Company. ​ Straight facts about the most used & abused drugs from alcohol to ecstasy. An informative book for adults and adolescents about substance abuse ​ Denning, P., Little, J. & Glickman, A. (2004). Over the Influence: The Harm Reduction Guide for Managing Drugs and Alcohol. New York: Guilford Press. ​ While some need a “total abstinence” approach to recovery from substance abuse, others benefit from this “harm reduction” approach that works to maintain limited use with less damaging effects ​ Beattie, M. (1992). Codependent No More. Center City, MN: Hazelden. ​ Useful advice for those who care about someone suffering from addiction. Emphasizes the need to avoid excessive efforts to control them, for the sake of both parties ​ Richandson, W. (1997). The Link Between A.D.D. & Addiction. Colorado Springs: Pinon Press. ​ A guide for adults to understand the relationship between ADD and addictions. Insightful, practical strategies for recovery

  • Dr. Brown's Books | Brown Clinic for Attention and Related Disorders | L.A.

    Top of Page Outside The Box Smart but Stuck A New Understanding of ADHD ADD: The Unfocused Mind ADHD Comorbidities Handbook Books Written by Thomas E. Brown, PhD Outside the Box: Rethinking ADD in Children and Adults— A Practical Guide Read Excerpt Read Critiques Outside the Box: Rethinking ADD/ADHD in Children and Adults—A Practical Guide identifies assumptions about ADD/ADHD that demand reevaluation in light of recent research. Building upon a current, science-based foundation, the book describes in practical terms how ADHD can be recognized at various ages; how it differs from more typical brain development; how it can significantly impair those affected; and how it can safely, and in most cases effectively, be treated in children and adults. ​ The book extends Dr. Brown’s previous work utilizing current scientific research but also the experience and perspective of the author, a clinician who has devoted more than 35 years to studying this disorder formally and countless hours to engaging with and providing treatment for a diversity of children, teenagers, and adults with ADHD and related problems. ​ The book’s audience includes laypersons and the wide variety of clinicians involved in assessing, treating, and/or monitoring the care of children and adults with this disorder (e.g., pediatricians, primary care physicians, psychologists, psychiatrists, neurologists, physician assistants, advanced practice nurses, and clinical social workers) and also educators, disability service providers, human resource specialists, and the adolescents and adults who seek more information about ADHD assessment and treatment for themselves or for family or friends. Table Contents: ​ Introduction Basic Facts and the Central Mystery of ADHD A New Model of ADHD: Executive Function Impairments Differences Among Persons With ADHD Ways ADHD Can Impair Functioning at Various Age Levels How ADHD Impacts “Brain Googling” for Motivations How ADHD Develops, Sometimes Gets Worse, and Sometimes Improves How and Why Other Disorders Often Co-Occur With ADHD Assessing Children, Teenagers, and Adults for ADHD Emotional Dynamics in Individuals, Couples, and Families Coping With ADHD Practical Aspects of Medication Treatments for ADHD Practical Aspects of Nonmedication Interventions for ADHD Treatment Adaptations for ADHD With Various Complications Available in paperback and in eBook formats Smart but Stuck: Emotions in Teens and Adults with ADHD Current diagnostic criteria for ADHD do not explicitly include problems with emotions, but many with ADHD have much difficulty with recognizing, responding to, and managing their emotions—both positive and negative. This book explains why many with ADHD struggle so much with emotions and what can be done about it. “Smart but Stuck” offers a series of true stories about intelligent teens and adults who had gotten “stuck” in failures at school, work, or in getting along with friends and family because of their ADHD. It shows how they got “unstuck” by dealing with ups and downs of emotions they didn’t know they had. ​ In this book you will meet and get to know 11 teens and adults including: ​ • Sue, who earned high grades until middle school, then lost motivation for schoolwork and became disorganized and oppositional in 9th grade, frustrating teachers and family while losing hope for herself. • Mike, a college student who was put on academic probation. His dad always told him he’s smart but just lazy, and now he’s starting to believe it. • Steve, a computer programmer whose ADHD struggles have led to him losing his job—and his wife. He’s good at programming computers, but not at programming himself. • Sarah, who’s had trouble keeping track of things and getting work done since she hit menopause. She’s puzzled, since she never had such a hard time when she was younger. Read Excerpt Read Critiques For information on how to order this book: From the United States, click here ​ From the United Kingdom and other European countries, click here A New Understanding of ADHD in Children and Adults Read Excerpt Read Critiques For over 100 years, ADHD has been seen as essentially a behavior disorder. Recent scientific research has developed a new paradigm which recognizes ADHD as a developmental disorder of the cognitive management system of the brain, its executive functions. This cutting-edge book pulls together key ideas of this new understanding of ADHD, explaining them and describing in understandable language scientific research that supports this new model. It addresses questions like: Why can those with ADHD focus very well on some tasks while having great difficulty in focusing on other tasks they recognize as important? How does brain development and functioning of persons with ADHD differ from others? How do impairments of ADHD change from childhood through adolescence and in adulthood? What treatments help to improve ADHD impairments? How do they work? Are they safe? Why do those with ADHD have additional emotional, cognitive, and learning disorders more often than most others? What commonly-held assumptions about ADHD have now been proven wrong by scientific research? ​ Psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, and other medical and mental health professionals, as well as those affected by ADHD and their families, will find this to be an insightful and invaluable resource. Table of Contents Introduction 35 Myths about ADHD and Why they are Wrong A New Paradigm for an Old Disorder: ADHD as Impaire d Executive Functions What Research Reveals about the Causes and Unfolding Nature of ADHD How the New Model Changes Assessment of ADHD in Children and Adults How Treatments for ADHD Affect the Brain and Improve Executive Functions Why Many Learning and Psychiatric Disorders so often Co-occur with ADHD References Index ​ For information on how to order this book: From the United States, click here From the United Kingdom and other European countries, click here Attention Deficit Disorder: The Unfocused Mind in Children and Adults Myths about Attention Deficit Disorder abound. This disorder often goes unrecognized, and even when diagnosed may be inadequately treated. In this up-to-date and clearly written book for the general public as well as professionals in medicine, mental health and education, Dr. Brown describes his new way of understanding ADD. Drawing on recent findings in neuroscience and a rich variety of case histories from his clinical practice, he describes what ADD syndrome is, how it can be recognized at different ages, and how it can best be treated. ​ This is the first book to address the perplexing question about ADD: how can individuals, some very bright, be chronically unable to “pay attention,” yet be able to focus very well on specific tasks that strongly interest them? Dr. Brown challenges the “willpower” explanation and explains how inherited malfunctions of the brain’s management system prevent some people from being able to deal adequately with challenging tasks of childhood, adolescence, and adulthood. His book is an authoritative and practical guide for physicians and psychologists, parents and teachers, and the 7 to 9 percent of persons who suffer from ADD or ADHD. Read Critiques For information on how to order this book: From the United States, click here From the United Kingdom and other European countries, click here ADHD Comorbidities: Handbook for ADHD Complications in Children and Adults Read Critiques Many books address various aspects of ADHD – but only ADHD Comorbidities: Handbook for ADHD Complications in Children and Adults comprehensively describes the multiple ways in which other psychiatric and learning disorders complicate ADHD in both children and adults. ​ This practical book features comprehensive, research-based information on ADHD and its full range of comorbidities – including anxiety disorders, mood disorders, learning disorders, substance abuse, sleep disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder, autism spectrum disorders, oppositionality and aggression, Tourette syndrome, and developmental coordination disorder. ​ The book offers a new paradigm for understanding ADHD, viewing it not as a simple behavior disorder, but as a complex developmental impairment of executive function, the management system of the brain. In accessible language, more than 30 researcher-clinician contributors summarize how to recognize ADHD and its comorbidities at various stages of development, from preschool age to adolescence to adulthood. Clinicians will find practical help “and acquire valuable guidance on tailoring medications and other interventions” to optimize treatment outcomes for patients of all ages with complex cases of ADHD.

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